March's Best Upcoming Art Exhibits

Art lovers can enjoy a variety of mediums and subjects in March, with the opening of new exhibits in the city. Watercolors, contemporary sculpture, and the beautiful needle-work of phulkaris come to life in Philly’s galleries, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA).

AMERICAN WATERCOLOR IN THE AGE OF HOMER AND SARGENT

When: Opening March 1st, 2017
Where: Philadelphia Museum of Art

One of the greatest times in American art history is the watercolor movement of the 19th century. Winslow Homer and John Singer Sargent, with their distinctly stunning landscapes and portraits, shaped the medium with extensive painting portfolios. Their work inspired artists like Maxfield Parrish, Jesse Wilcox Smith, and Childe Hassam, and created an artform where new arts and crafts designers felt welcome to experiment. A gallery of Homer’s and Sargent’s rarely seen masterpieces will trace the innovation of creativity of the popular movement.

PAUL CHAN: PILLOWSOPHIA

When: Opening March 15th, 2017
Where: Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA)

Paul Chan, an artist, writer, and publisher who uses classical philosophy to guide his interpretations of contemporary issues, presents Pillowsophia (after Ghostface) and his poem “New No’s” at the Morris Gallery. His sculptural animation mirrors inflatable figures typically seen outside car dealerships, and his poem examines the relationship between violence and current political discussions. The hollow nylon figure is brought to life by fans at its base. Experience Chan’s provocative and social-conscious pieces at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA).

PHULKARI: THE EMBROIDERED TEXTILES OF PUNJAB

When: Opening March 12th, 2017
Where: Philadelphia Museum of Art

Phulkari, ornately embroidered textiles from Punjab (a region between Pakistan and India), is a labor-intensive textile made of silk embroidery on a plain-woven cotton cloth. It is worn as a symbol of Punjabi cultural identity, and can be worn by women for special occasions or used as furniture covers. Women of a variety of religious groups have stitched phulkaris, and often used to design them for their dowries. This March, an exhibit featuring phulkaris from the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Collection and high-end fashion ensembles by Manish Malhotra, one of India’s top designers, come together in a display of vibrant color at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.